Here Is Imelda Marcos’ Crazy Shopping Spree That’s Worth Billions of Dollars

onemega imelda marcos shopping
It’s not news that Imelda Marcos gets what she wants and it is certain that she wants fame and fortune.

Imelda Marcos is the lady that wants it all. In the Imelda Marcos biography episode in Bio Channel revealed that young Imelda already got her life figured out: She would marry a powerful and prominent man that will bring her the moon and stars. True enough after college, she was the out-and-about-lady in Manila in search for the husband. She met Ferdinand Marcos who was then the most ambitious politician of the Philippines and get married just 11 days after meeting, and then the rest was history.

In 1975, Imelda Marcos was listed as one of the 10 richest women in the world, alongside Queen Elizabeth II. She was so rich that she did the most outrageous and craziest purchases in the course of her husband’s term as President of the Philippines. So crazy that it’s just impossible for one to do so, but Imelda could and she did.

She has her ways of buying remembrance for her trips abroad.

In one of her trips from Rome on their way back to the Philippines (in a private jet of course), Imelda told the pilot to make a U-turn because she forgot to buy cheese. The pilot obliged and the first lady got her cheese from Rome.

Also in another trip in the US, Imelda Marcos was once so fond of Macadamia nuts candies that she brought home 500 boxes of the candies to the Philippines.

Imelda would only have the best of all jewelry

As a frequent traveler to the United States, Imelda would buy jewelry that is worth billions of dollars. In one of her trips in the U.S, she bought $1.43 million-worth Bulgari jewels in addition to the $1.15 million emerald-and-diamond bracelet.

She also bought $451,000-worth of gems from Cartier. She also bought the craziest 35-carat barrel-shaped super rare pink diamond. Aside from that, she had her hands on other hues of pink diamonds with a significantly lower value than of the super rare variant. Only some of it was auctioned while the rest are still under the care of Imelda until today.

She has a thing for buying trinkets for her home abroad

In 1981, Imelda Marcos closed an auction by buying the entire catalog. She bought-out Leslie R. Samuels’ entire collection of art English antique furniture, and ceramics for more than $5 million.

In 1983, she spent a whopping $7 million in a 90-day trip to Rome, Copenhagen, and New York where she bought home items including Pratesi for bed sheets worth $10,340, Asprey sterling silver serving dishes worth $43,370, and $19,400 in assorted towels, tablecloths, and sheets.

Imelda also bought artworks from renowned artists like Claude Monet, Dutch Vincent Van Gogh, Albert Marquet. Only a few of the artworks were sold through auctions in the US and private transactions and about 200 pieces of artworks are still missing which include artworks by Michaelangelo, Pablo Picasso, and Vincent Van Gogh.

The “mine” girl had 3,000 pairs of shoes and dozens of a single blouse she likes at a store

“Great love for fashion” is an understatement to Imelda Marcos’ insane purchases of clothes, and shoes. One time, she was dubbed by a sales lady in Bloomingdale’s New York for pointing out the items that she liked while saying “Mine. Mine. Mine.”

It’s no secret that she has a ginormous collection of shoes with almost 3,000 pairs. What happens if she liked a blouse? She would buy 10 dozens of it. Sometimes, if she liked a certain item, she would order all of it until it would run-out in stores.

sometimes, small items would bore her that she bought buildings in Manhattan, new york

One day, after all the crazy shopping spree that Imelda did, she then started buying buildings in the most-expensive neighbourhood in New York City.

The Marcoses bought New York skyscrapers 730 Fifth Avenue, 200 Madison Avenue, Herald Center at Herald Square, and Woolworth building. Although she could have bought Empire State Building, according to reports, Imelda says its too “ostentatious”.

At the time, her husband is earning P60,000 annually as the President of the Philippines—amount that’s not even enough for a minute in the life of Imelda Marcos. Today, 32 years after his husband was overthrown in the Presidency, Imelda Marcos is found guilty of multiple counts of graft. She is 89 years old.

Related: After 27 Years, Imelda Marcos Found Guilty of Graft

After 27 Years, Imelda Marcos Found Guilty of Graft

Nearly almost three decades, Imelda Marcos found guilty of graft for creating private organizations in Switzerland according to the Ombudsman. During the time, Mrs. Marcos held a post in the government from 1968 to 1984, during the regime of his husband, the late president and dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

During the 1990s, 10 graft cases were filed against Marcos. Today after 27 years, Imelda is found guilty of seven counts.

Imelda Marcos and the pressed charges for 7 counts of graft

Then-first lady will face imprisonment of 6 years and 1 month to 11 years for each of the counts of her graft cases. Imelda Marcos is also perpetually disqualified for any government posts in the future. Imelda, currently Ilocos Norte representative, recently filed her certificate of candidacy for a gubernatorial post in Ilocos Norte.

Related: Here is Imelda Marcos’ crazy shopping spree that’s worth billions of dollars

There were no representatives from the Marcoses nor her counsel present in the courtroom during the proceedings. The Ombudsman gave the Marcos camp 30 days to explain why they were not present during the promulgation.

Related: Things We Do Everyday That People Cannot During Martial Law

The Things We Do Everyday That People Cannot Do 46 Years Ago

onemega if martial law was today

Today, we remember the day then-President and dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos’ declaration of Martial Law in the country under his regime. It’s been 46 years since the time that people almost always had to stay in their homes, whose mouths were shut, and cannot live the lives they want to. It’s the time when human rights were violated and all of the killings, torture, and oppressions took place.

The Philippines suffered for 9 years under Martial Law. About 70,000 people were caught and detained for being “enemies of the state”, about 34,000 Filipinos were tortured, and about 3,240 Filipinos killed. Until today, there are about 1,800 desaparecidos that are yet to be found because of the Martial Law.

If Martial Law was not lifted after the EDSA People Power Revolution, how would our lives be today?

1. ranting online

It’s normal and very easy for us to head on to Twitter and Facebook to rant about daily traffic, the hassle we experience in our daily commute, or how bad our experiences are in government offices are. It’s through the power of these platforms that we’re able to speak our minds and make a political stand. But if we were to live in a Martial Law era, we will not be allowed to have access to these sites. Worse, even ranting inside our own homes about the Government is illegal.

2. Night Parties

We look forward to the weekend cause it’s the best time to go out, gather, and party with our friends until wee hours. But during Martial Law, you have to be home by 11 PM to make sure you’ll be safe overnight. The strict 12:00 midnight to 4:00 AM curfew hours were imposed on people to stay inside their homes. People who are caught outdoors during these hours will be imprisoned by the law enforcers.

3. Read the daily news online

Today, our smartphones feed us every day with daily news from both local and international news organizations, tailor-fitted with our interests. However, if it was Martial Law, we are forced to consume news only from a government-owned news organization whose content is mandated by the government (AKA propaganda).

4. Asking the MMDA “What rule did I violate?”

In driving school, we were taught of the SOP that if ever the MMDA apprehends us, we must ask what rule did we violate before we hand over our license for inspection. But if we had lived under Martial Law, the Filipinos are not allowed to ask questions nor explain themselves once a law enforcer apprehends them. The Writ of Habeas Corpus was suspended, hence all the imprisonment during the time of Marcos.

Today’s “normal” are things we wouldn’t be able to do or enjoy 46 years ago.  The next time you see a friend who rants about the administration endlessly online, remember that these rights that we currently exercise should not be taken for granted.  Lastly, we also remember the Filipinos who fought hard in the past years for us to enjoy the freedom that we have today.